Blueberry Kintsugi Cheesecake | Recipeish | Gustus Vitae

Blueberry Kintsugi Cheesecake | Recipeish | Gustus Vitae

  • Yield: 1 Gorgeous cheesecake.
  • Time Estimate: 2 1/4 Hours, plus an overnight.
  • Storage Notes: Bet you can't keep it for more than 24 hours.
  • Difficulty: Medium. Spooning in the compôte is somewhat finicky.

Kintsugi is the Japanese art form of repairing broken pottery with gold-infused lacquer, treating the breakage and repair as something that forms the identity of a piece, making it more beautiful that what it once was.

Sure, that's kinda a lot for a pie, but this one is pretty special.

By overfilling a tart dish, not a pie pan, you'll get lovely cracks on the surface while retaining that luscious cheesecake consistency. Filling in these erratic, meandering crevices with a blueberry compôte results in not only a gorgeous pie, but an outrageously delicious one too.

 

Ingredients

For the Crust

For the Filling

For the Compôte

  • 1 1/2 Cups blueberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 1/3 Cup distilled water
  •  1/3 Cup icing sugar
Directions
    • Preheat oven to 325F.
    • In a medium mixing bowl, cream room temperature butter with Crystallized Honey Cane Sugar and California Sea Salt, then fold in graham cracker crumbs.
    • Press mixture, firmly, onto the bottom and sides of a 8-9" tart dish, like this handsome piece from Emile Henry, and pop in the freezer, uncovered, while you make the filling.
    • In a large mixing bowl, beat room temperature cream cheese until softened and fluffy.
    • Still beating, pour in Blueberry Pie Cane Sugars, Vanilla Bean Cane Sugar and cornstarch, then add eggs one at a time. Finally, fold in cream cheese.
    • Remove crust from the freezer, and pour in the filling. Fill to just a hair under the rim, and pop in the oven. You'll have a bit of filling left over - you can just discard, or freeze to make some mini-cheesecakes at a later date.
    • Bake, uncovered, for about 1 hour. The filling will rise and start cracking - it's done when the center is still jiggly, the top is browned but not burned, and a toothpick comes out clean.
    • Remove and rest for 15 minutes, then use a knife to loosen sides of the pan, and allow to cool for a further 45 minutes.
    • While it's cooling, make your compôte.
    • Start with simple syrup: bring equal parts distilled water and icing sugar to a boil, then lower temp to medium high, and add blueberries.
    • Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 10 minutes, or until you achieve a thick, saucy consistency, then lower to the lowest temperature on your stove.
    • Working slowly and carefully, use a small spoon to ladle the compôte into the crevices, filling up to the level of the crust. Loosely cover the cheesecake with foil, and chill in the fridge overnight.
    • Pour the leftover compôte in a jar, seal, and reserve in the fridge as well.
    • When you're ready, serve with a dollop of the reserved compôte, and devour.

    If you'd like to get your hands on this handsome tart dish, use code GV20 for 20% off at https://www.emilehenryusa.com/

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